Ethan Couch – More Excuses for Really Bad Behavior

ethan-couch-photoThere was a time when someone like, Ethan Couch, was called a “spoiled brat.”  But now, in a society where what’s right and wrong is getting more and more blurry every day, you can always find a professional to come up with some excuse for really bad behavior.

People who can’t keep it in their pants are called “sex addicts.”  Thugs who go around punching out pedestrians and then posting their criminal behavior on the internet are called “disenfranchised black youth.”

Now, we have 16-year old Texan, Ethan Couch, who killed four, yes four, innocent people while driving with a blood alcohol content of .24, was given a mere sentence of 10-years probation without serving a single day in jail.  And why?  Because Judge Jean Boyd apparently bought into the defense expert’s testimony.  Psychologist Gary Miller testified that Ethan grew up in a house where the parents were preoccupied with arguments that led to a divorce and that he suffered from “affluenza.”

This crap, according to what I’ve read, describes a condition in which children – generally from richer families – have a sense of entitlement, are irresponsible, make excuses for poor behavior, and sometimes dabble in drugs and alcohol.

In other words, the parents set no boundaries and the child suffers no consequences for his bad behavior.

According to the news reports, Hollie Boyles, and daughter, Shelby, left their home to help Breanna Mitchell, whose SUV had broken down. Brian Jennings, a youth pastor, was driving past and also stopped to help.

All four were killed when Ethan’s pickup plowed into the pedestrians on a road in Burleson, south of Fort Worth. His vehicle also struck a parked car, which then slid into another vehicle headed in the opposite direction.

Two people riding in the bed of his pickup were tossed in the crash and severely injured.  One is no longer able to move or talk because of a brain injury, while the other suffered internal injuries and broken bones.

Now, Ethan walks away practically scott free, unless, of course, you think probation is a big deal, which I don’t.  According to the Judge, “he’s a defendant in need of treatment.”  Instead of actually setting boundaries for this monster and making him pay for his mistakes, the court continued his parents’ way of thinking – make excuses for him and don’t make him suffer any consequences.

According to another psychologist, Dr. Gary Buffone, “Essentially what [s]he has done is slapped this child on the wrist for what is obviously a very serious offense which he would be responsible for in any other situation.  The defense is laughable, the disposition is horrifying … not only haven’t the parents set any consequences, but it’s being reinforced by the judge’s actions.”

I absolutely agree.  What lesson has Ethan learned from this entire situation?  None, as far as I’m concerned.  His parents no doubt paid for his attorney and his expert witness to come up with this nonsense, reinforcing his sense of entitlement and his knowledge that Mommy and Daddy will, once again, get him out of trouble.  Ten years probation.  Boo hoo!

As far as Ethan is concerned, I’ll keep what my husband always says in these situations in mind.  “No one gets out for free.”

For the rest of this bunch, I say shame on Ethan’s parents, his attorney (although some lawyers might think making up stuff is ok), the psychologist and especially the Judge, who had the power to provide justice to the families destroyed by this kid but chose not to.  If a poor kid, white or black, got into this situation, I guarantee he’d be in jail right now because he’s not suffering from “affluenza.”

I don’t get it, but if you do, God bless you.

Author Bio:

For over twenty years, Leona has tried to heed her husband’s advice, “you don’t have to say everything you think.” She’s failed miserably. Licensed to practice law in California and Washington, she works exclusively in the area of child abuse and neglect. She considers herself a news junkie and writes about people and events on her website, “I Don’t Get It,” which she describes as the “musings of an almost 60-year old conservative woman on political, social and cultural life in America.” It’s not her intention to offend anyone who “gets it.” She just doesn’t. Originally from Brooklyn, and later Los Angeles, she now lives with her husband, Michael, on a beautiful island in the Pacific Northwest, which she describes as a bastion of liberalism.
Author website: http://www.idontgetit.us
  • OO7AAA

    civil plantiffs , not defendants oops, point is stil valid

  • OO7AAA

    maybe there was deal made, behind closed doors, in chambers? if the couchs take full advantage of the appeals process, the defendants could be put thru a decades long series of legal circuses, before they every see a dime.
    but if the couchs agreed not to prolong the process, but go with the first decision, the defendants could get money by the end of next year, and start trying to get on with their lives. in return, the couchs wanted the kid not to go thru the texas department of corrections. sort of a quid pro quo.
    let’s see how quickly the civil suits are settled.

    • OO7AAA

      please read “civil plaintiffs” where it says “defendants” in the above post.

      • Bkwcomments

        His sentence doesn’t have anything to do with the civil suits. Those suits have just been filed and they’ll be heard in civil court, not criminal court, by a different judge. Please, PLEASE stop commenting on issues you don’t understand. Seriously. It makes you look like a moron.

        • OO7AAA

          the two cases are not connected, technically, but the kid in on probation for 10 years and the judge can throw him in slammer at the drop of a hat. I am saying they came to an “informal understanding” and if the couchs renege, and try to go the “appeal ad nauseam” route with the civil cases, that’s exactly where he is going.

          • Bkwcomments

            They can drag the CIVIL case out as long as the courts allow but that will have NO effect on his CRIMINAL sentence. The only way he could end up having his probation revoked is if he violates it. It has absolutely nothing to do with any civil actions, only his behavior in terms of following the probation agreement.

            Really, stop now. You’re not going to win this one because you don’t know W T F you’re talking about.

          • OO7AAA

            boy are you naïve, “terms of the probation agreement” that is a term you could drive a truck thru. and weather he has violated it., or not, is up to judge. talking back to someone at the facility, spitting on the sidewalk……………if push comes to shove, they might just have a joint planted on him……………right to the slammer.

          • Bkwcomments

            And that has NOTHING to do with the CIVIL actions. Are you always this dense?

          • Mary123s

            and neither do you because you are so high off of your outrage that you don’t want to hear anyone else’s opinion.

            this came from someone who actually knows what he’s talking about: from hotair.com’s comments on the case:

            “Don’t buy the media spin that he used “affluenza” as a defense he plead guilty to all crimes. Don’t buy the spin that it was war on wealth that got him off, he plead guilty.

            “It only came up in the sentencing after he plead guilty so there was no trial. What he got is it the hardest sentence that a 16 charged as a juvenile can get.

            They might have want the 20 years but when he turned 18 he would have been let go free and clear. Now he will be under the justice system
            for 10 years.

            Any violation in that rehab ect and he will get 10 years in jail for parole violation even after he is 18.

            Don’t turn this case into a rich vs. poor justice system. It could be a juvenile justice system vs adult system and and weak drunk driving causing death punishment problem nothing more.

  • OO7AAA

    CAPITALIST GREED, TIMES X 2.
    why was ethan allowed to live in this mini mansion, alone? because his father bought it years ago. after the divorce, he didn’t want to sell, (property values are still near rock bottom) so he put the kid there, to hold on to it, hoping property values go up.
    FRED also made his kid drive this heavy duty (monster) truck, so that he could keep it on the books as a “company car”.
    under other system of law, Chinese, Sharia ect., then can go right after the parents, long jail sentences ect. under American, (English common law). the parents skate.
    any legal scholars want to weigh in?

  • Bkwcomments

    Maybe a more appropriate sentence would also require him to spend the next year accompanying his badly injured friends to their rehab appointments. That might open up his eyes.

  • Chris G

    The judge did make the right decision. This boy was living in a permanent state of psychological delusionment provided by his irresponsible parents. We know this by his immediate reaction to the crash, despite his obvious direct involvement in the crashes’s enormity: “Don’t worry I’m Ethan Couch, I can get you out of this.” We know by his public facial expression now that he will never do anything wrong again in his life.
    Bankrupt the parents. Still, what I said about suicide still stands!

    • Bkwcomments

      So, you think the parents should be penalized and NOT the kid, but you also think the kid should kill himself? W T F? Who in their right mind suggests somebody should commit suicide? W T F is wrong with you?

  • Wheels55

    Did the judge at least take away the kid’s drivers license for 10 years? He’s rich and can afford to have a driver take him everywhere.
    If I was the judge and felt the way this judge feels, I would have given him a choice: prison or join the Peace Corps for 4 years.

  • Quint

    Karma, the famility is getting sued into oblivion and the family business wont last long…its already getting tore up on yelp and google reviews with about a 1.2 rating

    • Bkwcomments

      Unfortunately bankrupting the business would only create more innocent victims as employees lose their jobs. Here’s hoping somebody buys out the business (with the money going to the settlements of what will be multiple suits) and the employees can keep working.

  • Chris G

    What he should do, when you think about it, is commit suicide. If you don’t realize that this is what he should do, you haven’t thought deeply enough about it. Keep thinking about it, and what you’ll realize is that’s what he should do, COMMIT SUICIDE.

  • 2sents

    Ethan is a brat. Trayvon was a thug.

    • Bkwcomments

      And you know ths, how?

  • OO7AAA

    danb_tiffin has 7800 post, which means he is not a real person but a bunch of “touch typists” hired by Fascist/Nazi creeps like the Koch brothers, or other tea party , inherited wealth faggots, to come into blogs and spout their Nazi crap. is there anyway you can block them?

    • helplessinil

      His parents are registered DEMOCRATS

  • OO7AAA

    fdr was not a “liberal”, he was to the left of the bigoted, fascist Herbert hoover, but that makes him “middle of the road”. only a retarded dimwit, with some joke degrees that their daddy bought would make such a mistake, who runs this site, and lets such a**hole post?

  • DanB_Tiffin

    I was shown this a few days ago. Even the liberal FDR could see some things:

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt… 1935 State Of The Union address.

    “The lessons of history, confirmed by the evidence immediately before me, show conclusively that continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the nation fibre. To dole out relief in this way is to administer a narcotic, a subtle destroyer of the human spirit.”

    added later: It does not just disintegrate those on the dole.

    • OO7AAA

      “we don’t want to take money from the wealthy and give it to the poor, we want the people to help themselves!”
      aldoph hitler, Nuremberg, 1937

      • Patrick H

        Textbook case of Godwin’s Law right here, ladies and gentlemen!

        • Roger Ward

          First time I’ve heard of Godwin’s Law. Interesting, appropriate, and probably correct. Thanks!

          • Patrick H

            Yep, Godwin’s Law is essentially the rule of thumb that the longer an argument goes on, the more likely a comparison to Hilter or the Nazis will be made. To be honest, both the left and the right would retire Nazi and Hitler references. In the very rare cases they may apply, to be quite honest, if you have to appeal to a comparison Hitler, you’re not doing a very good of making your case.

        • OO7AAA

          not the above post, that only refers to hitler’s fascist economic policies, that Mussolini had been writing about for a decade before hitler came to power. (godwin’s law only applies to Nazism) danb_tiffin and the Koch brothers avowed economic policies are in many cases similar, if not a identical, to the fascist economic philosophy. that wealthy industrialists should be free to run the country, and the government’s main job is to help keep labour in line.
          I imagine that both donb_tiffin and the Koch brothers assume that they are part of some racially superior group, because they were lucky enough to be born to rich daddies. stupid people easily make such false deductions. so the Nazi comparison in later is post valid too.

          • Patrick H

            No, it applies to both Nazi AND Hitler references.

        • Ron F

          Patrick, I do not know of a similar law as Godwin’s Rule of Nazi Analogies but it seems that there should be a similar one for politics. The longer an internet discussion goes on, the greater the probability that someone will blame liberals or conservatives.

          • Patrick H

            Sadly I don’t think there is Ron, but you’re right, there should be. It seems like almost everyone, including myself, has been guilty of running that law. Then if we really wanted to, we could also write a law that the longer a discussion goes on, internet or otherwise, the greater the probability, that one side will blame the president if he or she is of the opposite party and/or ideology.

          • Ron F

            Patrick, one of the posts above refers to the parents being registered Democrats.

          • Patrick H

            Thank you for pointing that out Ron, you’re right. That’s exactly what I mean and I believe you meant. Sorry if you thought I was ignoring that, I was aware of it and did not mean to ignore that example.

  • Anthony

    A well written article, but why could it not be just be “Disenfranchised Youths”? There seems no need to bring race into this?

    • Roger Ward

      Mrs. Salazar made a passing reference to another series of crimes which helped to bolster her argument …. yet you bypassed the hundreds of words written to focus on one word (black.) One of the problems that we have as a society is an unwillingness to face the facts when they cause us discomfort. This inclination toward political correctness prevents us from confronting reality and moving forward. It is a fact that one hundred percent of the reported incidents of these vicious, premeditated and unprovoked attacks on pedestrians (the knockout game) have been perpetrated by blacks on unsuspecting whites. As these crimes were not the focus of her article, Mrs Salazar did not develop this issue …. but she did refer to the race of the perpetrators and you saw fit to ignore everything written, in order to object to a single, factual word? Rather than seeking out a word to delete, perhaps you would do well to confront this inclination toward Political Correctness?

      • Ron F

        Roger, I have not read every news report regarding the knockout game but I have not seen one that referred to the perpetrators as “disenfranchised youth”. They may not always refer to them as “thugs” but most refer to it as black on Jewish violence. I have only seen one report where a person was trying to justify it and that was a silly council person elect.

        • Roger Ward

          Ron, I have not called the criminals in the knockout game “disenfranchised black youth” or “disenfranchised youth.” The first time I saw such a phrase was in Mrs. Salazar’s article. Neither have I seen it referred to “black on Jewish violence.” (How could it be? The Jews I know look just like me: white, aging and good looking.) Until a better description comes along, I’ll just call them what they are: RACIST, COWARDLY, CRIMINAL THUGS.

          • Ron F

            Roger, I did not say you said it. I was referring to the article. It is about the only thing in the article with which I disagree. As for the black on Jewish violence, most articles I have seen, which is not representative, refer to the victims as Jewish and some people, including the council person elect tried to explain it in that context. I agree, they are thugs.

  • Epyon

    I agree with the fact that he shouldnt have gotten with a slap on the wrist, but to comment on his families affluence is going to far, in my opinion. He can only be judged on what he did and that alone, not what his parents did or didnt do. Do I think that he deserves something more than probation, Yes, do I think he needs to imprisoned for years; which is what your insinuating; then no. One day he will regret his actions, if he doesn’t already, and hopefully he will seek retribution for what he, himself, has done.

    • AskanceGlance

      But his family’s affluence has everything to do with why this is a slap in the face of justice! There’s one “justice” system for them and one for the rest of us. Did you perhaps miss the part about how he got such leniency because of his “affluenza”? That’s what this whole case was about: his family’s wealth supposedly making him incapable of understanding that his reckless behavior has consequences for which he needs to be held responsible! Don’t believe for a minute that a defendant (especially one of color) using the opposite rationale (i.e. blaming his rough, precarious upbringing) would have gotten even an ounce of this leniency…

      Wealthy criminals systematically get more lenient sentences or even none at all: http://dallasmorningviewsblog.dallasnews.com/2013/12/judge-who-gave-ethan-couch-his-affluenza-punishment-should-have-studied-chris-clarys-case.html/

      One only need compare Judge Boyd’s decision in the Couch case with her decision in another case with a poor defendant (who was also black, which is significant):

      *http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/16165482-judge-who-gave-rich-free-no-jail-time-for-killing-4-gave-black-teen-10-year-sentence

      *http://www.businessinsider.com/judge-jen-boyd-black-teen-prison-2013-12

      *Heck, even a website called The American Conservative posted about this disparity: http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/12/12/the-affluenza-defense-judge-rules-rich-kids-rich-kid-ness-makes-him-not-liable-for-deadly-drunk-driving-accident/

      *Here’s an interview with the sham psychologist who made up the “affluenza” excuse to protect his wealthy patient from getting a harsh sentence: http://www.mediaite.com/tv/anderson-cooper-affluenza-psychologist-in-totally-awkward-uncomfortable-interview/

      Also, I don’t know if you realize this but the family’s wealth is allowing little Ethan Couch to go to a posh vacation spa-like rehab facility where he’ll get to ride horses, eat organic food, learn mixed martial arts, etc. every day.: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2525293/Inside-luxury-rehab-center-affluenza-teen-Ethan-Couch-attend.html Take a good look at those pictures. Does that seem like justice to you? Four people are dead, one is paralyzed, and this wealthy kid gets to live the good life in a country club-like facility while the families of the victims only have a cemetery to go to… Why couldn’t he have served his time in the public juvenile system like other youth Judge Boyd has sentenced?

      Fortunately, if justice does exist, he and his family might not stay wealthy for long…

      *http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Victims-Families-File-Lawsuits-Against-Affluenza-Teen-236006321.html

      *http://www.ryot.org/affluenza-teen-ethan-couch-may-soon-be-broke/503757

      • Patrick H

        Let’s not bring politics here because I think is more of a class thing rather than a race thing. A rich black kid would be more likely to get off than a poor white kid, money is one of the few things in this country that is colorblind sadly. But make no regards about it, money doesn’t make character, it only magnifies it. He’d still be a jerk even if he was poor, this kid and would have done the same thing if he did.

        • Patrick H

          And no doubt this was a huge disgrace because like I said, if this was a poor kid, black OR white, he or she would be facing jail time right about now.

          • Bkwcomments

            The other problem with the sentencing inequality is that both acts could be described as unintentional consequences of a bad decision. The “rich, white kid” didn’t expect to crash, though someone with more maturity would know that is a foreseeable consequence of drinking and driving (a sixteen yr old should, too, but many teens don’t think like that). The “poor, black kid” probably didn’t expect the guy he hit to slam his head into the concrete and die. In my mind, the white kid should have gotten a longer prison sentence than the black kid. Hopefully the black kid is in a juvenile detention center where he’s also getting counseling and an education. Plus, why ten years? Don’t kids that age usually end up in juvvy until they’re eighteen, or even twenty-one, and then they’re released?

          • sandra

            Ive only been flying through comments and I don’t know what that states law is about trying teens but I tell you one thing here in tn 16 teen year olds who commited this type of crime could and probably would’ve been tried as an adult. plus I’ve seen some of the harsh and mean language some of you are using against each other. come on people it’s children seeing that they don’t have to respect humanity and other peoples right to the same that causes stuff like this. show alittle kindness to each other and teach your children and grandchildren about morals and values that is what has become lost in this nation. had that childs parents done this maybe this wouldn’t have happened.

          • Bkwcomments

            You make some good points. I think most states have the capacity to try those younger than eighteen as adults. I don’t know if this kid was. He should have been! Especially as these deaths were the direct result of other crimes: he stole the beer they dramk, he was a minor in possession of alchohol, he drank the alcohol, he drove drunk, he drove recklessly, and he left the scene of the accident. Apparently he had also taken some Valium, which should NEVER be mixed with alcohol, but I don’t know where he got it or whose prescription it was.

            He should have been tried as an adult and received an adult sentence. Let him serve the first two years in juvie then, when he turns eighteen move him to a men’s prison. But that didn’t happen. Hopefully the civil claims against him and his parents, and his father’s company as owner of the truck, will bankrupt them, they will be unable to afford the $450K per year treatment facility, and he’ll end up in the state system, which is where he belongs.

        • Bkwcomments

          That could be more a consequence of the poorer kid being assigned a public defender with limited resources to prepare a defense. But there are plenty of cases in which the rich person was justly punished. A prime example is Ethel Kennedy’s nephew, Michael Skakel, who in his forties (?) was sent to prison for killing “the girl next door” when they were both teens. (I’m sorry, I’m not sure if I have her last name right. Martha Moxley? Mosely?)

          • OO7AAA

            lol, that’s right, except skakel was framed by a republican DA who wanted to get some dirt on the kennedys. do you even know what you are talking about, or do you just repeat bull that you hear?

          • Bkwcomments

            Uh, yeah, I know what I’m talking about. And all I said was he got a just punishment. The fact is he was convicted of killing the girl. He could afford expensive defense attorneys and he provided many character witnesses, and still he went to prison. Which supports the point I made that many rich people do receive just punishment. Comprehend, much?

          • OO7AAA

            you DO NOT know what you are talking about. watch the tv show “the americans” and then you should be able to figure out who was behind that childs murder.

          • Bkwcomments

            I don’t give a shlt what some stupid TV show says. He was tried, he was convicted, and he has lost his appeals. My statement stands that he got a just punishment for the crime of which he was convicted. Those are the facts. But if you can’t comprehend that, I can understand why you base your thought process on what you watch on tv.

            FAIL. Done.

          • Patrick H

            Well, who’s more likely to get a harsher sentence? A poor white kid or a rich black kid? What do you think? My thoughts that it’s a class thing and any racial disparity has to do with the fact that poorer people tend to be of color.

    • Bkwcomments

      Epyon, are you talking about retribution in an afterlife, in a religious sense? Because, typically speaking, retribution in the real world usually involves some kind of act AGAINST a perpetrator like Couch. It can be a jail sentence, where the state seeks retribution, or a financial penalty such as the victims and their families seeking retribution against him, or it could mean vengeance, in which case somebdy might beat the crap out of him (or worse) in retribution for what he did.

  • phillip
  • OO7AAA

    it’s the father that’s to blame! fred couch owns a sheet metal factory, take a look at the parking of the factory, and you will find all most a dozen heavy duty pickup trucks, probably useful vehicles in such a business. a multi millionaire, instead of buying a reasonable car, he let the kid drive in this monster truck, so he could keep it on the books as a “company” car, thus deducting the expenses. TAX FRAUD.
    as actor pat o’brian said once “there are no bad children, just bad parents”

  • http://www.charlene.cc/ Charlene

    Unfortunately, he will do this again. Eventually he will get a judge that is worth his/her salt. How many more have to die to get to that point? Their blood will all be on this judge’s head.

    • Bkwcomments

      I think he’s young enough that, IF he gets enough of the right kind of rehab and counseling, he could end up doing something productive with his life. But if he doess do it again he damn well better get a just punishment.

  • Roger Ward

    Askance Glance,
    It is possible that I may stand corrected, but all the facts are not in yet. After googling Judge Jean Boyd, it appears that she is a Republican (although not necessarily a Conservative) …. but I never alluded to her political party — you did. Until there is evidence whether she is to the left or the right, I’ll stand by my original comment.
    I have never been a conspiracy theorist but now I begin to wonder if she actually did receive some pay-off for her decision. Is she just another example of a corrupt politician? How else to explain her absolutely outrageous decision? (By the way, I post under my true name, not some anonymous pseudonym; why don’t you have the courage to do the same?)

    • AskanceGlance

      Roger Ward,

      This is Texas we’re talking about… if you think she could possibly have been elected as a left-leaning (much less a far left-leaning) Republican, you’re being a tad bit naive. C’mon on now…

      All you need to do is look at her other verdicts to see that she is clearly a conservative. One of the most glaring ones is her sentencing of a 14 year-old African American youth – or, to say it like it is: a disenfranchised black youth – to a decade-long prison sentence when he only killed one person (to Ethan Couch’s 4)! When you add this comparison, the decision in the Couch case becomes far more problematic than just a rich kid getting a slap on the wrist. In addition to that, it’s a stark example of the deeply-rooted systemic racism of the criminal (in)justice system.

      *http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/16165482-judge-who-gave-rich-free-no-jail-time-for-killing-4-gave-black-teen-10-year-sentence

      *http://www.businessinsider.com/judge-jen-boyd-black-teen-prison-2013-12

      *Heck, even a website called The American Conservative posted about this disparity: http://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/rich-white-teen-killers-vs-poor-black-teen-killers/

      Don’t believe for a minute that a defendant (especially one of color) using the opposite rationale (i.e. blaming his rough, precarious upbringing) would have gotten even an ounce of this leniency…

      As for anonymity, it’s my prerogative to post anonymously on the internet. You can still engage with the substance of my arguments regardless of the name under which I post.

      • Patrick H

        Askaglance, I’d hate to tell you this, there are actually liberals in Texas.

        • Bkwcomments

          I think the point is most of the elected officials in TX are conservative. There definitely are liberals, but not necessarily enough to make a difference, politically. And when judges are elected usually they are also conservative.

          • ph16

            Okay I get it, you are a liberal, you think conservatives are bad. Can we just claim that she’s a bad judge, rather than a conservative judge? Stop using conservative like it’s a dirty word.

          • Patrick H

            Good point, but I hate howaskaglance is now using the stereotype of “Republicans only care about rich people” in this case to make a political point.

  • Terrence Green

    please sign this petition to have the Judge removed from the bench http://www.change.org/petitions/governor-rick-perry-take-judge-jean-boyd-off-the-bench

    • Eddy

      I would sign but it won’t make a difference.

      • Terrence Green

        Eddy, if my forefathers thought that way. I would still be in the cotton fields. Well I would probably work inside the house but you get my drift. If people don’t say anything. How can they expect anything to change?

        • Eddy

          Action is better than none, I get what your message but this America we’re talking about. The land of the injustice.

  • gold7406

    affluenza was a term first used in the mid to late 90’s about the money that young people made from the dotcom companies before the bust of 2000.
    the judge was a fool and was probably offered something, after her term is up.
    in most other states this would have not happened.

  • Ron F

    I generally agree with you that this is an outrage. On the other hand, I do not know how many people call thugs “disenfranchised black youth”. In addition, I think the attorneys did their job. They provided the best defense for their client under the law. I am surprised that in Texas, a judge would allow a defense of “affluenza”. Most states require that there be acceptance in the scientific community before allowing a theory such as affluenz. I hope your husband is correct but I do not know if no one finally gets out for free. Finally, I disagree with Roger only in that I do not know if only a far left leaning judge could have handed down the decision.

  • Roger Ward

    “Outrage” does not begin to describe my feelings about this case …. and the way I feel about the actions taken by the judge, the defense attorney, and the expert witness(es.) I don’t know what the judge’s history is in other criminal sentencing matters or whether or not she is known to be a “defendant’s judge” …. but I know what her politics are: only a far left-leaning judge could have handed down this travesty. I feel so sorry for the dead, the injured, and their families, all of whom have been denied justice. Will they ever again have a merry Christmas?

    • AskanceGlance

      “…but I know what her politics are: only a far left-leaning judge could have handed down this travesty.”

      You do know that the judge was a *Republican* right? If she had actually been far-left leaning, genuine justice would have been done in this case. A far-left leaning judge wouldn’t have bought the “affluenza” excuse for a second and would have made sure that this rich spoiled brat was held fully accountable. She had to have been paid off… Her utter and complete disregard for humanity isn’t surprising at all for a far *right*-leaning judge! After all, how could she possibly look her fellow far right-leaning country club buddies in the eyes after harshly sentencing one of their precious kids?

      “Will they ever again have a merry Christmas?”

      That’s assuming they all celebrate Christmas to begin with. It’s possible but in a country that is quickly changing and in which Christians are no longer the majority, this isn’t a safe assumption to make… Here’s a gift for you, kind sir: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2013/12/12/religion-in-americas-states-and-counties-in-6-maps/

      Happy festivus for the rest of us!

      • Bkwcomments

        Merry Christmahannukwaanza!

      • SAWB69

        What a load of crap! Loony left losers chime in again with idiotic nonsense.